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drinks

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I used to think that absinthe was "abs in the". It confused me a lot.

Anon
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Once when I was four years old, my mom and I were having dinner. Someone had told me before that grape juice stains(probably talking about clothes, of course). Along with dinner I was drinking a glass of grape juice. Just to clear the confusion, I asked my mom if grape juice stained, which of course, she said yes. Well I had gotten grape juice on my upper lip. Being as I was four years old, I started bawling my head off and ran to the bathroom to wash it off so it wouldn't stain my upper lip!

Brittany =)
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I used to believe that you gor red hair from drinking coffee. My Grandmother told me so.

jackie
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When I was growing up, my best friend and went to the same pediatrician. Therefore we thought it was perfectly safe for us to drink out of the same glass since we "shared the same germs". I don't know which one of us came up with that idea, but we both believed it.

Denise
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I grew up in a non-acoholic family. So, the day my mom decided to rinse my hair with beer after washing it, I cried terribly while she had me leaning over the sink. (Crying upside down hurts the sinuses!) She got so perplexed with me for crying until I told her that I didn't want to get drunk. I thought for sure that her rinising my hair with beer would make me that way.

Anon
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i was sitting with grandma one scortching hot day, she had a glass of ice water. she told me the condensation on the outside of the glass was water seeping through the glass. i believed this one until about a year ago. teehee

josh
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when i was about 5 my teenage cousin saw me looking at his glass of pepsi. he told me the bubbles were from little tiny fish swimming around in the soda, i believed that one for years...

Brett
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My mom told me that a glass of water has gone bad when you can se bubbles in it. To this day, I have big problems with drinking bubbly water, even if I'm very thirsty and there's no fresh water in sight.

Liz
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On the Starbucks disposable coffee cups, there's a little thing printed near the bottom that says, "Careful, the beverage you're about to enjoy is extremely hot." Well, I thought that the people that worked at Starbucks would individually gauge the heat of each drink, and then write that there if the drink was hot! I always thought, "Oh, how thoughtful of them!"

Ariel
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As teenagers, back in the 1950s, we were told that taking aspirin with Coke would make us drunk. An awful lot of kids believed that, but (as an adult) I used to take aspirin with Coke all the time...with NO effects!

Diane
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top belief!

When I was about 10, I was drinking the last can of Coke. I wanted some more, so I took a Pepsi that was in the refrigerator since it's pretty much the same. My dad, not wanting me to drink anymore, told me that if I drank Coke and Pepsi together, it would bubble up into my lungs and I'd suffocate and most likely die. She told me that the reason they had the Coke and Pepsi at opposite ends of the isle in the store was so if they were to spill it wouldn't explode. I believed this for about three years. My friends all thought I was nuts when I would ever so daringly get a cup of each, spill them on top of each other while outside, and run like a mad woman.

Amanda
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When I was a small child I lived in New Jersey, but travled two to three times a year to visit family in West Virginia.

Well if you know anything about regional words, you might know that some areas call soft drinks pop and others soda. New Jersey it's Soda, West Virginia it's Pop.

Until I was about five I believed that soda was brown (Coke, Pepsi, Dr. Pepper, Etc.) and pop was "colored" (Orange, Grape, Peach, etc). All because at home I was given dark pop's and while visiting family I was given light pop.

I've since overcome my confusion and now everything is pop.

Mandi
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My brother and I use to drink orange squash which was said to contain 5% orange juice. We figured that if we drank 20 glasses of orange squash, it would be as good as eating one orange and therefor very healthy for you. If an apple a day kept the doctor away, why wouldn't the same apply to an orange? Therefor 20 glasses of orange squash would also keep the doctor away! It's obvious, isn't it?!

Natasja
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When I was 5 or 6 my grandparents had some friend of theirs drop in during the afternoon. He was stumbling around the kitchen and fell into the frying pan, and my grandparents told me he was blind and couldn't see. Years later I asked my gramma who that blind guy was. She figured out a while later this was some neighbour who had gotten really drunk and been kicked out of his house by his wife. They told me he was blind so I wouldn't know he was so drunk. I never even guessed.

S.C.
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I used to believe that all men drank thier coffee black and all women used cream in their coffee. This is how my parents drank theirs and I just made the assumption it was universal. I was 19 and working as a waitress the first time I saw a male use cream in his coffee. I was as shocked as if I had witnessed any other "unnatural" act!

Claire Luz
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until I was about 7 or 8 I thought that when my grandma would ask or say "soada water" that she would accualy add water to my soada to keep me form being hyper!

ADHD
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I used to think that drinking coffee would make you taller. My dad's parents were both short, and pretty much all he drinks is coffee. So when I was four, I started making coffee for him and myself. It's not working...I'm 5'3" and done growing...

Jessica Aspra
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top belief!

I use to believe that if you left a glass of water next to your bed while you were sleeping it would get warm because flies peed in it.

Xambonie
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When I was a kid, my dad told me that Dr. Pepper was really nasty and it would make me sick, for some reason. I guess he just didn't like it when he was a kid, so he assumed I wouldn't either, but for YEARS, I wouldn't go near the stuff, because I'd never tried it, but I just somehow *knew* that it was nasty, lol. Now it's like, my favourite pop ever, and I drink it all the time. You know, the diet kind actually tastes *almost* as good as the regular?

Emily
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When I was 5 my grandma and I drove past a restraunt and their sign said "Half price cocktails". I asked my grandma what a cock was and she said a rooster. And I had a fit because I thought they were eating cock's tails.

Anon
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