i used to believe

Established in 2002 and now featuring 76694 beliefs!

sections

animals
at home
bad habits
body functions
body parts
death
food
grown-ups
kids
language
make-believe
media
music
nature
neighbourhood
people
religion
school
science
sex
the law
the past
the world
time
toilets
transport

speaking

Show most recent or highest rated first.

page 29 of 61

< 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28  29  30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 >


When I was 10, I visited my aunt and uncle in the city for a week, they lived in a condominium. Back at home My mom and I were walking back home from Church and I told her "When I grow up I want to live in a condom!" My mom explained the correct word 'condo'. But she never did say why she blushed when I pronounced it wrong.

Shalindria
score for this belief : 2vote this belief upvote this belief down

I often heard people being called dirt bags and wondered what that ment, until one time I was visiting an aunt that had an apple tree in her garden. She was having a problem with moose eating the tree so she tied white bags with dirt in them too a rope fence around the base of the tree. It scared the moose away. I naturally assumed these were dirt bags but never could figure out why you would consider a person to be one.

missa
score for this belief : 2.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

When I was rather young, my friend and I thought we could speak with British accents as if it was a whole different language, and we wrote it differently. All as were to be substituted for os, so bath became both (pronounce bawth). The opposite was also true; all os became as. So "Let's go" would become "Let's ga (gay)."

We used to speak in this manner around our parents, thinking they couldn't understand a word that we said. And of course, we had cracked a code; everyone wrote their words with these alternate spellings in England.

Nat sa British Noncy
score for this belief : 3vote this belief upvote this belief down

I used to think "understood" meant you didn't understand, because "under" means down. My mom would scold me and say, "Am I understood?" and I'd sheepishly reply "no", which got me 5 minutes in the corner every time for being a "smartmouth". One day, I heard someone use "understand" and "understood" in the same sentence, and it clicked.

Jamie
score for this belief : 2.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

When I was about 8, my dad and I watched an old movie he'd seen as a kid. He mentioned having a crush on the young actress in the movie when he was younger, and said he would have "given his right arm" to go on a date with her. For the life of me, I couldn't understand why she'd want his right arm anyway.

Jamie
score for this belief : 2.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

When I was younger I heard the word manure used (my mother and most nearby relatives had gardens), but had never seen it written. When I finally saw it I failed to connect the spoken word with what I was reading, so I gave it my own pronunciation: man'yer. It took a while to dicsover the mistake.

Charles
score for this belief : 2vote this belief upvote this belief down

when people would say "no offence" i thought it meant don t build a fence between us if you don t like what i m about to say.

Anon
score for this belief : 2.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

my sisters friend is form finland and having only heard the word infantry thought it was an infant tree, liek a tree full of infants.

numa numa
score for this belief : 2.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

when i was little I didn't know about prefixes on words being able to be attached to other words and got double barrelled words mixed up. I always wondering why multi-storey car parks weren't multi-coloured.

Heather
score for this belief : 3vote this belief upvote this belief down

I used to think that an episode was an episoda, and that it was a kind of soda that made you sick when you drank it (epi meaning EPIdemic). I got upset when somebody was talking about that funny episode of Spongebob, thinking that they were jerks to think that Spongebob with a disease was funny.

Anon
score for this belief : 3.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

I could not figure out how one could feel sorry for *themselves* (it just seems so circular) until one day it hit me that that's what I was doing. I think of that often now, whenever I'm feeling sorry for myself.

Sarah
score for this belief : 2vote this belief upvote this belief down

whenever adults used to say "the king was overthrown" i would picture in my head that they actually picked him by his clothes and threw him out of the window of the castle. and i would take other words literally too but thats just the first one i remember

christina
score for this belief : 2vote this belief upvote this belief down

I used to believe that the word 'caterpillar" was the big trucks that were used for road works....not a brand!

J@M & $uG@r
score for this belief : 2vote this belief upvote this belief down

When I was younger I thought the the letters L, M, N, O, P were all one letter!!

Brittany
score for this belief : 2.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

top belief!

When I was young I always used to get the words "prodigy" and "prostitute" mixed up. And my older brother, after a piano lesson wanted to show off too me and out parents. When he was done, we all clapped and I blurted out " Well arent you just a child prostitute!"

Anon
score for this belief : 4vote this belief upvote this belief down

I used to think people on the West Coast of the US were the only people in the world without accents. If you went a little bit further east, everybody had Texas accents, and if you went to the East Coast, everybody had New York accents. I thought Midwestern people and East Coast people must be real jealous of the West Coast people, because we were the only normal ones. I sure was enlightened back then, huh?

anonymous
score for this belief : 3vote this belief upvote this belief down

My father used to use "oblivious" when he meant "obvious" because he thought it was funny, so i went through grade school thinking they meant the same thing

jeremy
score for this belief : 3vote this belief upvote this belief down

I used to think that "lagoon" and "legume" were the same word. I thought a lagoon was so called because it is roughly shaped like a pea pod.

Valerie
score for this belief : 3.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

top belief!

My fianace grew up around his father and cars and always talking about them, looking at them, etc. One night I noticed that he was using the word "deluxe" in the wrong context, and asked him what he thought it meant. When he responded that it mean "bad" or "worse then the rest" i was baffled that he had the exact opposite meaning of what it really meant. I asked him why he thought that. He said that because in cars the "deluxe" version is always the worse of the models. You have stuff like "supreme" and all the super decked out models. Than the base model they still call something nice like "deluxe" even though it's the bottom model. So he thought it meant crappy version.

Anon
score for this belief : 4vote this belief upvote this belief down

I used to think that "infared" could be pronounsed either "infa-red" or "inffrared" (pronounced in-frared(like in-prayer-ed with an f insted of a p )

Now i know there is no such word as "infrared"
I still think infared looks like infrared though.

KrazyK
score for this belief : 2vote this belief upvote this belief down


I Used To Believe™ © 2002 - 2024 Mat Connolley, another Iteracy website.   privacy policy