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the pledge

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When I was in preschool and they first tought us the pledge, I thought that the last line, "liberty and justice for all" was "liberty and justice frog." Was I wrong or what.

Lauren
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I pledge a legion to the flag of the indicted steaks of america. and to the repugnant, for richard stanz, one naked, under guard, in the lizardball, with liver, cheese and puffed rice for all!
yes...I said this....

wasted
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When I was younger my father and mother were horrified when I told them that the teacher at school was teaching us about America and witches. Being devout Christains, they wanted to know why witches were being discussed with a pre schooler. Come to find out I had mistaked the "for which it stands" in the pledge for "for witches stand".

Anon
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I used to believe that in the Pledge of Allegiance you would say "For Richard Stands" instead of "For which it stands" Till the 8th grade i had no idea.

Allie
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A friend of mine went over to the US for a year, and because we live in Australia, we never had to say the pledge. At the parent teacher interview in the middle of the year, her mother said to the teacher, "Natasha's finally learnt the words to the pledge" and the teacher said "Oh, don't you say that in Australia?"

Ceiridwen
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this isnt my belief.. but i heard it from my 5th grade teacher.. every monday.. we would recite the anthem.. and the part "and to the republic.. for which it stands" was totally missunderstood by one of her former kids... one day he went up to her and asked "whos Richard Stands?" then she laughed n corrected him .. its which it stands.. not richard stands ;)

NaZ
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In third/second grade, we always recited the pledge of allegiance before first period. In the part which says 'For which it stands', everyone would say 'For Richard Stanz', convinced that the chant was a dedication to some guy named Richard Stanz. Once day, there was a visitor who came to our school whose name was Rick Stantse, and he was plagued with questions about the pledge.

TAsciusKL@Fui
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Through second grade I always concluded the pledge with '...indivisible, with liberty and just a straw.'

George
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When we first learned the Pledge of Alligence, I didn't know that the word "indivisible" was a word. I thought the teacher always said it wrong, so whenever we came to that part, I said "...one nation, under God, invisible, with liberty and justice for all"

Anon
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the pledge of allegiance: I pledge all legions to the flag of the knighted sates of america and to the republican richard stans, on nation under god, undies visible with livery injustice for all.

Anon
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I used to think "from which it stands" was "for Richard Stans".

cobra
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My friend (who has numerous little speech impediments) used to believe that the line "for which it stands" actually said "for witches stand," and was deeply confused by the importance of witches in the US pledge. She held this belief until she was 16 years old, and finally saw the pledge in print. Unfortunately for her, she made the mistake of telling me, and I make fun of her every time I get the chance!

Amused
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For the longest time I thought Jesus's name was Richard. (And to the rebublic, for *Richard* stands, as one nation under God...) -_-;

Bunni
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The words as I understood them went something like:

Attach a lesion to the flag, of the United States of America,
into the Republic, where witches stand,
one nation, underground, and invisible, with liberty—and just this!—for all.

Each time I visited with friends and family for a year or so following my mastery of these enigmatic lyrics I was required, by my mother, to make a solo performance for everyone’s enjoyment.

Inevitably, once I took my place in front of my audience, someone from the crowd would cry out, in a shouting whisper, “Your right hand, Ricky! Other side! There you go!” at which point I would locate my heart, cover it as required by my teacher and this disturbing song, and proceed with my rendering of it.

I must say that every recital received applause and laudations from its spectators. Either I delivered it with such passion and fluidity that no one paid attention to the words I uttered, or they themselves didn’t know the true words and thus thought nothing of my odd rendition of them, or it was simply a wonderful joke amongst the grown-folks to watch little Ricky’s brow furrow at the speculation of where in our town the Republic might lie and just how many witches could be found there loitering about, preying upon young schoolboys. I suspect the latter of these possibilities to be the most likely.

Rick(y)
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When I was in kindergarten, a bunch of different international flags hung on the walls of the classroom (I guess to show respect for ethnic diversity), and in the front of the classroom was the huge American Flag. Every day when we'd have to say the Pledge of Alligence, the teacher would say, "Now turn and face the flag." Because she never specified WHICH flag to turn to, I'd pledge alligence to a different flag every day! Eventually the teacher caught on and asked me what I was doing. When I explained myself, she laughed for about ten minutes straight!

Daile
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When I was in kindergarden my Mum thaught I was learning some foreign language and immediatly called the teacher to find out why she wasn't told about. Here is what I was saying: "A fledga leedga tooda flack". It turned out to be the Pledge of Alleagance.

Tammy
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In the first grade we learned the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag and I remember resenting having to do so, because nobody ever explained to us why we had to salute a mere object!!
So every time we saluted the flag, I went through the motions but my mind was dead set against paying homage to a thing. Only later did I learn the significance of the act.

Dreamy
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Would you believe liver, tea, and justice for all? Tea I could take, but liver? Ewg!

Texas granny
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When I first learned the Pledge of Allegiance in school, I thought I had to say the whole thing EVERY time I saw the flag.

Krista
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i used to believe that it was a sin (i'm a catholic) to not pray during the moment of silence after the pledge. i thought it was something thati needed 2 confess to the priest!

messed up catholic
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