i used to believe

Established in 2002 and now featuring 76205 beliefs!

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top belief!

Chinese, French, German, English, Clownisian.
When I was 4, these were some of the world's nationalities. Chinese people in China, French people in France and Clowns in Clownisia. This was obviously the truth at the time.

Stalin
score for this belief : 4.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

When I was younger I use to think the term "Caucasian" was a term used to refer to Mexicans with a lighter/whiter complexion. It wasn't until I was around 8 years old I understood what it meant. Mind you I grew up in a community of mainly whites and hispanics. Talk about some really confusing conversations.

Anon
score for this belief : 2.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

top belief!

When I was young, I believed that because my mother was born in New Mexico, that I was part Mexican.

Anon
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top belief!

I was 7 or 8 years old when my parents told me we were moving to England and I was convinced that London would be a small village with fluffy, warm dry snow all over it. I was very disappointed when I saw my first London snow storm (a whole 3 mm of cold wet grubby ice. Yuck!)

I also learnt about other kids' beliefs. I went to a school in Slough, where a pretty decent number of nationalities were represented and yet when I told them I was from South Africa, the response was: "but you can't be African! You're not black!"

Other favourites were:

"Did you have TVs?"
"Did you live in a mud hut?"
"Do lions wander all round the streets?"

Kids, eh?

Ex-South African
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top belief!

I used to believe that there were only two countries in the world, England and France. Everything in France was the opposite to how it was in England, so a frown meant they were smiling, and when they cried it meant they were laughing!

Tala
score for this belief : 4.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

I used to beleive that there was someone just like me, in some far off place like CHINA or somewhere, and they looked the same, and had the same name, and did exactly the same stuff as me, at the same time. I thought that one day I would go to far off China and meet myself.

Cookia
score for this belief : 3.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

top belief!

When I was in first or second grade, I asked a dusky-skinned girl what nationality she was. She told me she was Indian, and I told her something along the lines of that she couldn't be because Indians wore their hair in braids and she didn't. It wasn't until years later that I realized she meant Indians from India rather than Native Americans (who in old pictures most always have their hair braided). However, for years after that, she often, if not always, wore her hair braided, and I wonder now if she took my words to heart.

AJT
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I used to believe that you can tell the Chinese from the Japanese by the way their eyes slant. Eyes of the Chinese slant downwards and eyes of the Japanese slant upwards.

Anamarija
score for this belief : 2.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

At a younger age, everytime I heard the word "Palestinians" on TV or what not, I always thought they were saying "Palace Indians".

Chris
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top belief!

I remember my mom explaining languages to me while in a mall after hearing someone speak spanish. For some reason after that I always associated the Japanese with suits from the mall and thought you could tell someone was Japanese if they were wearing a suit.

Stephen
score for this belief : 4vote this belief upvote this belief down

top belief!

when i was in kindergarten, we used to have this racial appreciation thing where every week we would celebrate and learn about a new race/culture through each other. so it was going to be my turn soon to share my race and culture, and i asked my dad what i was. he said i was scottish cuz he's weird. but really, i'm 100% chinese. yeah so i told my class that i was chinese...but scottish at the same time. so for the longest time (i think up until 4th grade), i believed i was scottish somehow.

i just talked to my brother, and my brother said that he believed he was part hawaiian for a while too. man. my dad sucks.

Jen
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top belief!

I used to believe that immigrants to a new country would eventually grow to look like the typical inhabitants of the country that they make their new home. For example, I thought that Chinese immigrants to the United States would eventually grow to look like "typical Americans" and no longer "look Chinese" after a sufficient period of living in the United States. That sufficient period, I envisioned, would be a few years or so.

Diana
score for this belief : 4.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

top belief!

My ethnic heritage became important to me when I was in second grade. My parents told me that I was "...mostly Scottish and French." I asked my mother what I was LEAST and she replied, "Chinese."

Quite truly, the next day at show and tell I announced to the class that I was a very small bit Chinese.

Wily
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i used to believe that i am american.
i am japanese .

mayumi
score for this belief : 3.5vote this belief upvote this belief down

when i was little my daddy told me i was half indian... and i pulled out my arms looked down and my legs and asked him what part

bree <33
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top belief!

I thought people from Turkey actually praised turkeys...

Anon
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I used to believe that because i was jewish, i wasn't american. What could have contributed to this idea is the fact that i didn't know the national anthem.

Nolan
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I used to believe that anyone who wasn't British (as I am) thought of themselves as foreigners!

"velveire"
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top belief!

I was always stumped with this when I was younger: I knew that Chinese people ate with chopsticks and that American people ate with forks, and I remember thinking that if Americans used those miniature forks to feed their babies what did Chinese mothers use? Toothpicks? Twigs?
Some of you might have heard this elsewhere as a joke, but I assure you that I really thought it. ;)

dumb
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top belief!

When i was little i used to believe that only Americans could change their accents to match other peoples', like Australians or English for instance. I thought they were "stuck" with their accents for life or something, but Americans had this ability to talk differently. My good friend, who's from England, began talking with an American accent after being teased about hers, and i was shocked!

anonymous
score for this belief : 5vote this belief upvote this belief down


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