i used to believe

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When I was young I used to think that there were two kinds of weeks: The short ones and the longer ones. I remember that in between both of them were the weekends. I simply can't understand why I thought this!

pmaionese
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top belief!

I was told to do things in the "meantime" at school. I used to think the meantime was a season like spring or summer, so i wouldn't do the work and just sat there bemused.

Lowesy
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When I was about 10 or 11 years old, that was the first time I had ever paid attention to daylight savings time. It was in spring, so the time went up an hour. I remember sitting on my front porch one day after the time change, realizing that it was nearly 8:00 pm and the sun was still up and being totally amazed by that. Then I started thinking, if the time keeps moving up one of these days its going to be midnight and the sun will be out. I just thought the time kept moving up every year. Anyways I had it expalined to me eventually and learned how daylight savings time really worked. I thought that would have been so cool though. : )

Lana
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I thought that a year was divided into two parts, the "school year" and "summer break" - they each felt equally long. It wasnt until my sister (damn her) explained otherwise that I realize how short the summerbreak actually was in comparison.

Anon
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When 1969 turned to 1970 my Dad showed me a calendar and tried to explain days, weeks, months, years and decades. I picked all that up quickly enough but couldn't for the life of me figure out how the four digits representing the year figured into the picture. I thought that the year that was ending had 1,969 days in it and the new year was going to have 1,970 days, and this would just keep going on and on, that every year would get longer. But adults were always saying "Every year seems to get shorter." I was totally flummoxed until this was properly explained.

Demitria Monde Thraam
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top belief!

In Australia you can ring a number and it tells you the exact time ... Ala "At the third stroke the time will be 3.31 and 10 seconds.. *boop* *boop* *boop*"
I used to think that was father time... Obviously I was brainwashed by my brother

Bec, Vic
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top belief!

i used to have a hard time when i was trying to learn how to read a real clock. my theory was that if an hour is longer than a minute, then the long hand was the hour and the short one for minutes. i was always late comming home... of really early.

ArcAinA
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top belief!

I started visualizing time as circular from a very young age. I see the days of the week are like segments of a doughnut, with Saturday and Sunday at the top (a little larger than the others) and Wednesday at the bottom. I see the days the same way and also the calendar, with Dec/Jan/Feb at the top. I was in college when we discussed our thoughts about time before I realized that I am not "typical" and that most people have very linear views of time.

occupational therapist
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top belief!

As a kid, I believed time moved vertically (up & down), and was somewhere deep, DEEP in the ground or floor. If you wished to peek at the future, or "tomorrow", you could dig into the dirt in the yard, and if you went far enough down, the next day would be there, ready to go!

Zac C.
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well, to understand that u might have to know some greek but i ll explain anyway: in greek there are two words: "ura" meaning tail and "ora" meaning hour. so a friend'mum used to tell her that she would sleep for an hour (ora) but she thought she heard ura (tail)!! she grew up believing that time is counted in tails (ura)!!!

to marilena with love. nana
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When I was a kid I realised that in Australia it must be the middle of the night when England was sitting down to eat lunch. This was immediately dismissed as insane, because they would have to get up at midnight to catch any sort of daylight.

Jim Methley
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top belief!

I believed the year 2000 was named so, because the Earth could only last for 2000 years. When that year came around, I had the belief that the Earth would split and break up just because it's time was up.

GT
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top belief!

As a very small child, I asked my mother what tomorrow was--meaning the concept. She told me tomorrow was Friday. Several weeks and three days later, proud of my new knowledge, I announced to her that "tomorrow is Friday." "No," she said. "Tomorrow is Monday." This thoroughly threw me.

C.C.
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As a result of hearing the song "I Love Paris," I used to think that spring, summer, fall and winter were "moments."

C.C.
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top belief!

I used to believe that the only way to get to the next day was to go to sleep.

C.C.
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Hearing someone once use the phrase "Tuesday Week" (to mean a week on Tuesday) as a small child, I became convinced that sometime when I was about 6/7 there was a whole week where every day was a Tuesday.

Even after I figured out what was really meant by it, I still remained convinced this had happened for a long time.

BeeLady
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When I was in third grade, in the early 90's I was reading a book about the millenium with a friend. I was convienced that we'd all be old and/or dead by that time. He tried to tell me otherwise, but it didn't exactly work. I forget when I found out the truth.

Davy
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When I was in my early teens, I firmly believed that good days and bad days alternated, i.e. I had a good day and a bad day and a good day and so on.
I used to wake up in dread of bad days and quite optimistic on good ones. I even noted it down in my dairy, to keep track. I believed this for years, till it just faded away.

Cathy Galland
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One New Years Eve when I was small, my mother came up to talk me into bed, and as she left the room she called "see you next year". I started crying and shouted "Why? Where are you going till then?" thinking she was going away for a year!

P x
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I used to believe that someone controlled time and he would stop it for a really long time. Well, I used to belive that if you were going to say something you would forget it, and that's why I always forgot something I was going to say.

Zoe
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