i used to believe

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road signs

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page 14 of 20

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There was a concrete plant near my house. A sign at the exit, directed towards truck drivers leaving the plant, read "Remember, when you leave this spot, YOU ARE Century-Crete." I always thought that was a warning to trespassers - if you fell in the concrete-mixing vat, there was no mercy. You were now a part of the concrete.

MK
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When my family went on long drives, I thought that the "Do Not Pass" signs meant that we were breaking the law every time we drove past the sign. I remember getting really nervous and looking for police cars.

emmagrl
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top belief!

we have road signs that have a car on two wheels with two squiggly lines underneath it. (which means the road is slippery) but when my brother was little he beleived that if you parked your car in this area, people would draw lines on your car.

r. varney
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When I was about 4, I used to believe that when traveling on a road that said dead end, you would die at the end of the road.

Christie
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When I was younger I would see signs on the side of the road that said DO NOT PASS. i really thought that it meant you could not go any further on the road! lol

KrazyKatie
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Ever seen a No Outlet sign? It means basically the same as Dead End. I used to think it meant all houses on that road have no electric outlets because they must not have power.

Shannon
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On the A40, at the outskirts of London is Northolt Airfield. Where the road crosses the centre line of the main runway, the lamp posts are cut down in size. I used to believe (because my father told me)that this was where lamp-posts were grown.

Anon
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i used to believe that when we were travelling to my grandmas house that there were actually signs that said "one more hour til grandmas house!" haha

mary
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In South Dakota, (coyote and sunshine state) when you go by a historical marker there is a picture of a sun, and a coyote on the back. One day my grandmother said look, there is a sun-dog...referring to the sky and the ring around the sun...and we just happened to be going by one of those signs. So for a long time, I believed that when you go by one of those signs....look up!

sticktoyourguns
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As a child growing up in Connecticut, my mother read me the sign with the arrow on the entrance ramp to I-95 south. It said Connecticut Turnpike. Since we made a turn to get on the entrance ramp, I always thought that the entrance ramp was THE Connecticut Turnpike, and I was so proud that it was in my town!

Arlyn
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My mother and I used to go driving at night a lot (my father worked the night shift). She liked to go around and play "pretend" with me...like what kind of furniture would we have if we lived in that house? Anyway, this involved driving in many small neighborhoods where it's all Dead Ends and Cul-de-Sacs. Everytime I saw the sign "Dead End," I panicked. I envisioned an end to the road much like the cliffs in the old Wile. E. Coyote cartoons. I always thought "Dead End" meant...hear ya go...over the cliff...this is your dead end.

Lindsay
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I thought for the longest time that a No Standing traffic sign meant no person should stand near that sign.

Shannon
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When I was little, I thought that a road bearing a "No Exit" sign meant that, once you'd entered the road, you weren't allowed to leave. As we once lived on such a street, I wondered how Dad could drive in and out every day.

Anna
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When I was younger I would read the traffic signs on the side of the road but could never understand why we were passing the ones that clearly said "DO NOT PASS" - I finally decided it must mean going off the road onto the area behind the sign. Obviously I was wrong on both counts!

Patricia
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top belief!

when i was learning to read i used to think that PASS WITH CARE signs said PASS WITH CAR and there was a sidewalk by the road. i thought that to pass that sign you had to take your car with you. i thought that to go for a walk on the sidewalk you had to pull your car with a rope to pass the sign on the sidewalk

kk
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driving with my father when I was six, he said " I have been driving down this road ten years and have never seen a yied cross this street" for years when I saw a yield crossing sign, I looked at both sides of the road for one to jump out.

Al
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When I used to see the sign 'police accident' I thought it meant that a police car had crashed.

Anon
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I can remember riding in the car as a child and seeing signs on the side of the road that read "Do Not Pass". I was always nervous that my parents were going to get in trouble for not stopping. They never seemed to even contemplate stopping, and no other cars ever stopped, either. These signs were often followed by "Pass with Care" signs, which made me think that we had to be especially cautious for some reason when traveling there. I was always aware that nobody else seemed to be upset by all the illegal "passing" that was going on so I figured they had to know something I didn't and that it would be revealed to me in time. I knew I would get laughed at if I asked out loud, so I never did. I would watch from the back seat to see if they saw the sign and if they would slow down or look out for hidden obstacles.

Yes, I am still neurotic.

hillbilligrl
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Up till around age 6, i thought the word must in the traffic signs that said "left lane must turn left" was pronounced MMM-EWWW-ST, like mew the cat makes. I always read them out loud saying it that way and no one bothered to correct me. I could read fluently by then, read the word right in other books, but not on the signs!

*Andrea*
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When I was little, I used to believe that deer could only cross the road at the deer crossing signs.

Shellie
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